Kilbirnie / North Ayrshire, Poems, Uncategorized

Poem about Kilbirnie #NorthAyrshire: The Mossend Mine

The Mossend Mine

While walking near the Mossend mine
I chanced upon a flower
I stopped and stared at beauty spent
and passed away the hour

Her leaves were yellow daffodils
where bees would pass the time
watching men go underground
While entering the mine

Her stem did sway with summer breeze
she slumbered on the brink
like a burdened miner walks
whilst thirsting for a drink

Suddenly a voice I heard
transported back in time
young men with blackened faces walked
deep inside that mine

Awaking, flowers, buttercups
Blessed me on my way
Whilst haunting thoughts of distant past
I carried through my day

So if a flower does call you back
to places, lands of yore,
dwell not in the realm of dreams
take only what is yours

Perhaps your flower is yet to come
in mountain, thoughts or clime
ne’er mind the times of centuries old
now is your only time

Uncategorized

Scottish Gaelic Lesson 4 – Yes. No and Accents.

In Gaelic, there are no words for simply yes or no, the way to agree or to disagree is by repeating a little bit of the sentence

Tha e fuar

Tha! Tha e fuar!

Tha e blath

Chan eil e blah

To ask a question you use a bheil ..

A bheil thu fuar?

chan eil mi fuar!

The accent . we haven´t used it so far.

The accent is written as a grave accent (Scottish Gaelic: stràc throm, “heavy stroke/accent”) in Scottish Gaelic, as opposed to the acute accent (Irish: síneadh fada, “length accent”; Scottish Gaelic: stràc gheur, “sharp stroke/accent”) used in Irish; This basically means that in Scottish Gaelic it looks like a little backslash whereas in Irish it looks like a little forwardslash: hence the word for “welcome” is written as fàilte in Scottish Gaelic and in Irish as fáilte. Irish has no backslashes, only forward ones, while until recently Scottish Gaelic had both grave and acute accents which were used to differentiate between open and closed vowel sounds. However, recent spelling reform has meant that there are now only grave accents (forwardslashes) in Scottish Gaelic, the opposite of Irish.

A grave accent over a vowel means that it’s pronounced according to its long value rather than its short one. like this:

  • à represents the sound in English father.
  • è represents the sound in English dare,
  • ì represents the sound in English sheep.
  • ò represents the sound in English dock.
  • ù represents a sound pretty close to English sewer, but as a single sound

I will try to remember to type these from now on!