Kilbirnie / North Ayrshire, Uncategorized

Glengarnock Steel Social Night – Whist Drive, 1921

Names in this article and likely in the photo: James Gibson,  Mary Steele, G Jaffray,  E.Pirrett, M.Martin, Alan Walker,  Ed Kellett,  G. Hamilton, Doris Gaze, D McKee, Margaret Fulton,  WI Thomson, Tom Davidson, M. Kircaldy, (mentioned in some football results elsewhere)  E Hamilton, J. Graham, Alan Hamilton,  John Archibald, Bert Smith, WM Baillie.

whist2.jpg

whist drive 1921

Kilbirnie / North Ayrshire, photos/images/video

William Rabey´s Reading Room #northayrshire #northayrshirelibraries #glengarnock

The first ever library in North Ayrshire was opened at the Steel Works by Robert Rabey, here we can see him with the founding Elders of the Hebron Hall Glengarnock

L-R Montgomery Barclay, William Rabey, Charlie Loughlin and John Peebles

PIC1

Kilbirnie / North Ayrshire, Uncategorized

#northayrshire #kilbirnie : How the Longbar got it’s name #beith

I was trying to explain to a friend about the “Longbar”  (And how rough it used to be) when he asked me where the name came from.

It was built on top of another earlier group of houses known as “the Lambert”. Over time and with the number of folk moving in, it then became known as the Lamber, then langbar and someone clearly thought this was a bit colloquial so they finally corrected Lang to Long and it became “Longbar”.

 

Poems, Uncategorized

#northayrshire poem for #glengarnock station #scotland

One thought I had of you today
As people crowded by
Of sending soldiers on there way
Till  1945

Mothers kissed and lover’s words
Then anxious notes you passed
Bringing news of hero’s deaths
Or home bound boys at last

Pavements wet with women’s tears
For boys, to welcome home
While others sat in darkened rooms
Both silent and alone

Then later in your ageing years
Cemented floors did bloom
With flowers, lovely  colours bright
While mighty engines boomed

Then darkness came with Beeching’s words
Your branches they were slain
For all your older dearest friends
Were killed for London’s gain

Now you stand with empty home
No soldiers pass your way
A house lies derelict above
Where once a guardsman stayed

You carried folk to far off lands
To meet their boats and planes
Babies laughing, children coughed
Sheltering from smoggy rains

There’s few stand now in early morn
Upon your tired brow
Yet ne’r can match those wartime scenes
Of hundreds, cheering crowds.